Observational Assessments—why and how

Posted by Julie Delazyn

An Observational Assessment, in which an observer watches a participant perform a task and rates his or her performance, make it possible to evaluate skills or abilities that are difficult to measure using “traditional” assessments.

As Jim Farrell noted in a previous post, “By allowing a mentor to observe someone perform while applying a rubric to their performance, you allow for not only analytics of performance but the ability to compare to other individuals or to agreed benchmarks for performing a task. Also, feedback collected during the assessment can be displayed in a coaching report for later debriefing and learning.”

Click here for examples of how different types of organizations capture performance data and measure competencies using observational assessments.

If you would like to learn more about Observational Assessments, check out this SlideShare presentation. Also, this video – one of many instructional resources available in our Learning Café –offers a brief overview and shows how to schedule an observational assessment, deliver it to mobile device and report on the results.

Delivering and Reporting on Observational Assessments Using Questionmark Perception

One Response to “Observational Assessments—why and how”

  1. […] procedural steps are omitted, an observational assessment is an effective, pro-active solution. See Observational Assessments—why and how for more on this, or see my earlier post in this series on competency testing in health care. Such […]

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