Teaching to the test and testing to what we teach

Austin FosseyPosted by Austin Fossey

We have all heard assertions that widespread assessment creates a propensity for instructors to “teach to the test.” This often conjures images of students memorizing facts without context in order to eke out passing scores on a multiple choice assessment.

But as Jay Phelan and Julia Phelan argue in their essay, Teaching to the (Right) Test, teaching to the test is usually problematic when we have a faulty test. When our curriculum, instruction, and assessment are aligned, teaching to the test can be beneficial because we have are testing what we taught. We can flip this around and assert that we should be testing to what we teach.

There is little doubt that poorly-designed assessments have made their way into some slices of our educational and professional spheres. Bad assessment designs can stem from shoddy domain modeling, improper item types, or poor reporting.test classroom

Nevertheless, valid, reliable, and actionable assessments can improve learning and performance. When we teach to a well-designed assessment, we should be teaching what we would have taught anyway, but now we have a meaningful measurement instrument that can help students and instructors improve.

I admit that there are constructs like creativity and teamwork that are more difficult to define, and appropriate assessment for these learning goals can be difficult. We may instinctively cringe at the thought of assessing an area like creativity—I would hate to see a percentage score assigned to my creativity.

But if creativity is a learning goal, we should be collecting evidence that helps us support the argument that our students are learning to be creative. A multiple choice test may be the wrong tool for that job, but we can use frameworks like evidence-centered design (ECD) to decide what information we want to collect (and the best methods for collecting it) to demonstrate our students’ creativity.

Assessments have evolved a lot over the past 25 years, and with better technology and design, test developers can improve the validity of the assessments and their utility in instruction. This includes new item types, simulation environments, improved data collection, a variety of measurement models, and better reporting of results. In some programs, the assessment is actually embedded in the everyday work or games that the participant would be interacting with anyway—a strategy that Valerie Shute calls stealth assessment.

With a growing number of tools available to us, test developers should always be striving to improve how we test what we teach so that we can proudly teach to the test.

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