Using the Question Type Report in Questionmark Analytics

This week’s “how to” article highlights the “Question Type Report,” one of the Questionmark Analytics reports now available in Questionmark OnDemand.

  • What it does: This item bank report tells how many questions you have in your repository by question type (e.g., multiple choice, yes/no, etc.).
  • Who should use it: This report gives testing, assessment, learning and education professionals a quick view of what their item bank looks like.
  • How it looks: This report lists various color-coded question types (e.g., numeric, essay, multiple response, multiple choice) and  graphically represents how many of each type there are. The report can be viewed in a web browser or downloaded and distributed as a PDF. The CSV version of this report lists question types in the first column and the number of questions per topic in the remaining columns. The question detail CSV distribution provides information such as each question’s Perception question ID, status, topic and question type. You can see the information for your entire repository or just for specific topics.

Three-day Questionmark Perception training planned for Chicago, London

julie-smallPosted by Julie Delazyn

For customers transitioning to Questionmark Perception version 5 and for new users coming on board, our three-day training courses offer the opportunity to learn directly from a Perception expert.

Whether you are new to Questionmark or already have experience, this is a great way to get up to speed and start producing professional looking results more easily than you would otherwise. You can even bring some of your own surveys, quizzes or tests to enter into Perception to get some work done while you learn!

Our next U.S. course is set for Chicago June 7 – 9,  and online registration is available now. Click here to learn more about the course and sign up.

We also have U.K. training courses scheduled in London monthly from May through September.

Space is limited, so we encourage you to register early.

Using the Survey Frequency Analysis Report in Questionmark Analytics

This week’s “how to” article highlights the Survey Frequency Analysis Report, one of the many Questionmark Analytics reports now available in Questionmark OnDemand.

Last week we examined the “Class Detail” report, which provides detailed question-level course evaluation information for a single instructor for a single course. This week we’ll take a look at the “Survey Frequency Analysis Report”:

  • What it does: This report provides simple frequency information about answers participants provide for every question on a course evaluation or other type of survey.
  • Who should use it: This report can help a broad audience including learning/education/training professionals and HR survey administrators who want a quick overview of survey question responses.
  • How it looks: The report lists each question on the survey and displays a graph showing the corresponding number of participants responding to each answer option. The report also provides a number of CSV options to get the data out in user-friendly formats. So in addition to getting the frequency analysis information, you can also get the participant response information to conduct further analyses using SPSS or other analysis tools.

Web Seminars: Questionmark Basics, Perception v5, Mobile Delivery & More

Joan Phaup

Posted by Joan Phaup

One of the easiest ways to learn about different aspects of using Questionmark Perception is to spend an hour with us on a free Web seminar. We have a variety of sessions planned for spring and summer in the U.S. and the U.K. Here’s what’s currently on offer:

A Perception Orientation Webinar – Learn the basics of authoring, delivering and reporting on surveys, quizzes, tests and exams.

  • UK sessions at 10 a.m. BST (British Summer Time)  May 6, 13, 18 and 27
  • US sessions at 3 p.m. April 26, 11 a.m.  May 3 and 3 p.m. May 10 (all Eastern Daylight Time)

Creating Assessments for Mobile Delivery – Learn how to deliver a single assessment to Apple, Android and other mobile devices. See how mobile delivery can be used on its own or as part of a blended delivery strategy. Discover some key applications for mobile assessments, including surveys, quick quizzes, observational assessments and mobile testing “centers” and identify considerations for delivering online content to a small screen.

  • Scheduled for 3 p.m. Eastern Time  April 27

What’s New in Questionmark Perception Version 5? – Get an overview and demonstration of Perception’s latest features, ideal for  current Questionmark users preparing to upgrade or for anyone who wants to learn about what’s new.

  • Scheduled for 3 p.m. Eastern Time May 4

Questionmark Customers Online – Hear case study presentations by Questionmark Perception users.

  • Dynamically Generating Certificates from an Assessment at 3 p.m. Eastern Time May 18
  • Applying Diagnostic Assessments in a Virtual Corporate University at 1 p.m. Eastern Time June 28

Once you’ve chosen which session(s) you’d like to attend, just click on registration to sign up. We look forward to having you with us.

Evidence from Medical Education that Quizzes Do Slow the Forgetting Curve

Posted by John Kleeman

I’ve recently come across a really exciting set of results from a study of doctors-in-training that show quizzes really do slow down the forgetting curve.

To remind you, once we learn something, we start to follow a downwards “forgetting curve”. Psychology research says that taking quizzes and tests can reduce the forgetting curve by giving us retrieval practice, which helps retain information. But it’s rare to see this shown in action quite so vividly as in an experiment conducted with doctors-in-training and published in the respected Medical Education journal. (The citation is: Larsen, D. P., Butler, A. C. and Roediger III, H. L. (2009), Repeated testing improves long-term retention relative to repeated study: a randomised controlled trial. Medical Education, 43: 1174–1181.)

In this experiment, Dr Douglas Larsen and colleagues Butler and Roediger from Washington University in St Louis divided some doctors-in- training into two groups of about 20 people each. The doctors were learning about two medical topics : status epilepticus  and myasthenia gravis, abbreviated to SE and MG below.

Group A did the following:

  • Study session on both SE and MG
  • Quiz on SE immediately after the session and equal re-study time spent on MG
  • 2 weeks after study session, quiz on SE and equal re-study time on MG
  • 4 weeks after study session, quiz on SE and equal re-study time on MG
  • 6 months later, test on both SE and MG

Group B did the same with SE and MG switched round, ie

  • Study session on both SE and MG
  • Quiz on MG immediately after the session and equal re-study time spent on SE
  • 2 weeks after study session, quiz on MG and equal re-study time on SE
  • 4 weeks after study session, quiz on MG and equal re-study time on SE
  • 6 months later, test on both SE and MG

If spending time on re-study and taking a quiz have equal benefit to retention, then you would expect that both groups would perform about the same on the final test.

But if taking a quiz does actually aid retention and slow down forgetting, then you would expect that Group A would do better on SE than group B, and that group B would do better on MG than group A.

So what did happen? Here are the results for topic SE; you can see that group A initially scored an average of 78% and then knowledge reduced over time to 42% on the final test. However group B got a final score of 31%, much lower.

Results for SE

And here are the results for topic MG; group B, who did the earlier quizzes/tests on MG, scored an average of 36% on the final test, but group A, who’d just done the studying, got 19%.

Results for MG

These results show very clearly that taking the quizzes/tests helped people retain information vs. spending the same amount of time re-studying. And the study gives a dramatic picture of what happens in real learning – how people do forget, but also how quizzes and tests can reduce this.

Using the Class Detail Report

This week’s “how to” article highlights one of the four Questionmark Analytics reports specific to course evaluation, now available in Questionmark OnDemand.

Last week we examined the “Instructor Summary” report, which compares average course evaluation rates for each instructor of a specific course. This week we’ll take a look at the “Class Detail Report”:

  • What it does: provides detailed question-level course evaluation information for a single instructor for a single course.
  • Who should use it: This report is ideal for managers and learning/education/training professionals desiring to analyze detailed course evaluation responses to help improve future learning experiences.
  • How it looks: Participant comments are listed if this qualitative data was captured. As with every report in Questionmark Analytics, PDF and CSV distribution formats are available.
    • The class summary report is broken down into two components:
      • Detailed item-by-item analysis of responses
      • Participant comments for each question
      • See a screenshot of the instructor summary report below the table of statistics

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