New white paper: Questionmark and Microsoft Office 365

Posted by John Kleeman

I’m pleased to inform you of a new white paper fresh off the press on Questionmark and Microsoft Office 365.

Office logoThis white paper explains how Microsoft Office 365 complements the Questionmark OnDemand assessment management system; and how you can use Office 365 to launch Questionmark surveys, quizzes, tests and exams, how to consume Office 365 resources within Questionmark, and how Office 365 can help analyze results from assessments. You can download the white paper here.

The white paper also describes some of the reasons that organizations use assessments and why it is important for assessments to be valid, reliable and trustable.

Launching assessments from Office 365

Being able to call assessments from within Office 365 allows you to closely connect an assessment to content, for example to check understanding after learning. The white paper describes how you can:

  • Call Questionmark assessments from the Office 365 app launcher
  • Launch an assessment from within a Word, Excel or other Office document
  • Embed an assessment inside a PowerPoint presentation
  • Launch or embed assessments from SharePoint
  • Use SAML to have common identities and seamless authentication between Office 365 and Questionmark OnDemand. The benefit of this is that test-takers can login once to Office 365 and then can take tests in Questionmark OnDemand without needing to login again.

Using Office 365 resources within assessments

Illustration of a picture of a video being used inside an assessmentAssessments of competence are in general more accurate when the questions simulate the performance environment being measured. By putting video, sound, graphics and other media within question stimulus, you help put the participant’s mind into an environment closer to how he/she will be when doing a real-world job task. This makes the question more accurate in measuring the performance of such tasks.

To help take advantage of this, a common use of Office 365 with Questionmark OnDemand is  to make media and other resources that you can use within assessments. The white paper describes how you can use Office 365 Video, PowerPoint, SmartArt and other Office 365 tools to make videos and other useful question content.

Using Office 365 to help analyze results of assessments

People have been using Microsoft Excel to help analyze assessment results since the 1980s and the white paper describes some suggestions on how to do that most effectively with Questionmark OnDemand.

Newer Microsoft tools can also be used to provide powerful insight into assessment results. Questionmark OnDemand makes available assessment data in an OData feed, which can be consumed by business intelligence systems like Power BI. OData is an open protocol to allow the creation and consumption of queryable and interoperable data in a simple and standard way. The white paper also describes how to use OData and Power BI to get further analysis and visualizations from Questionmark OnDemand.

 

The white paper is easy to read and gives practical advice. I recommend reading this white paper if your organization uses Office 365 and Questionmark or if you are considering doing so. You can download the white paper (free with registration) from the Questionmark website.  You can also see other white papers, eBooks and other helpful resources at www.questionmark.com/learningresources.

 

Questionmark Conference 2018 – Registration is Open!

Posted by Brian McNamara

We are excited to announce that registration for Questionmark Conference 2018 is now open!

Questionmark customers will gather March 6th – 9th in Savannah, Georgia, for three days of learning, networking and professional development opportunities.   Whether you are a new user or a pro, Questionmark Conference is the ideal place to get vital information, insight and learning about the latest assessment technologies.

Join us at the Westin Savannah Harbor to enjoy southern hospitality with your peers and the Questionmark team to:

  • Learn about new Questionmark features and functions
  • Attend engaging hands-on product training sessions
  • Network with fellow Questionmark users
  • Get valuable tips, insights and best-practice guidance
  • Plan for the future with a sneak peek at the product road map

Registration is now open at special early-bird rates. Visit the conference website today for details!

Questionmark Conference 2018: Assess for Success | March 6-9 in Savannah

Twelve tips to make questions translation ready

Posted by John Kleeman

We all know the perils of mis-translation. My favourite mis-translation is the perhaps apocryphal tale of a laundry in Rome, Italy putting up a sign in English saying “Ladies, leave your clothes here and spend the afternoon having a good time.” With Questionmark having a translation management system to help you translate questions and assessments, here are some good practice tips on writing questions so they will be easy to translate.

1. Avoid questions that assume syntax is the same in all languages, for example fill-in-blank questions that rely on word order. For example, in English, the verb goes in the middle of a sentence but in Turkish and Korean, the verb is usually at the end of a sentence.

2. Also avoid “broken stem questions”, where the stem is an incomplete sentence and the participant must select the most appropriate answer to finish the sentence. That’s likely to be challenging to translate in some languages where the ordering may not make sense.

3. Keep questions simple. Avoid unnecessarily complex text or question stems with redundancy or unnecessary repetition. Such questions are best simplified before you translate them.

4. Avoid metaphors and idiomatic language in general; things like “in small steps” or “disappear into thin air”, could well introduce translation mistakes.

5. Avoid passive voice where you can. Not all languages make it easy to translate this, and it’s usually best to just use active voice.

6. Thoroughly review questions prior to translation to ensure no ambiguity. if the question wording is ambiguous, the translator’s interpretation of the question may not be the same as that of the question author.

7. If you are using a rating scale across many questions, investigate its cultural appropriateness and, if possible, whether it is widely used in the target language.

8. Test items based on nuances of vocabulary, descriptions of emotions or abstract concepts can be hard to translate, as different languages may have different vocabulary connotations.

9. You also need to be aware of the risk that translating a question could cause a question to become obvious due to different words in the target language, like the following Swedish example.

Question that shows a Swedish translation giving the answer to a question by words being the same

10. Avoid using cultural context within question stimulus. If you are presenting a scenario, make it one that is relevant to different cultures and languages. If it is difficult to avoid a culturally marked context, consider preparing good guidelines for translators in which you define what adaptations are encouraged, desirable and ruled out

11. If your question contains a graphic or video, consider if you can remove any text from it and still keep the question meaningful. Otherwise you need to translate the text in the graphic or video in each language.

12. if you are translating items into several languages, it can be cost effective to conduct a translatability assessment on the items before you do the detailed translation. This will alert to possible issues within various language families prior to doing the more substantial work of full translation. A translatability assessment lets you identify and fix issues early and relatively cheaply. See here for a blog from Steve Dept of CApStAn that explains more.

Thanks to Steve Dept for inspiring this blog post with an excellent conference presentation at EATP last year and for helping me write this article. For some more advice on translating and adapting tests, see the International Test Commission Guidelines for Translating and Adapting Tests or the Cross-cultural Survey Guidelines (CCSG), both of which have been recently updated.

I hope this advice helps you be efficient in your translation efforts. For information on Questionmark OnDemand which includes translation management system capabilities, see www.questionmark.com.