4 Ways to Identify a Content Breach

Austin Fossey-42Posted by Austin Fossey

In my last post, I discussed five ways you can limit the use of breached content so that a person with unauthorized access to your test content will have limited opportunities to put that information to use; however, those measures only control the problem of a content breach. Our next goal is to identify when a content breach has occurred so that we can remedy the problem through changes to the assessment or disciplinary actions against the parties involved in the breach.

mitigating risk

Interested in learning about item analysis or how-to take your test planning to the next level? I will be presenting a series of workshops on at the Questionmark Conference 2016: Shaping the Future of Assessment in Miami, April 12-15. 

Channel for Reporting

In most cases, you (the assessment program staff) will not be the first to find out that content has been stolen. You are far more likely to learn about the problem through a tip from another participant or stakeholder. One of the best things your organization can do to identify a content breach is to have a clear process for letting people report these concerns, as well as a detailed policy for what to do if a breach is found.

For example, you may want to have a disciplinary policy to address the investigation process, potential consequences, and an appeals process for participants who allegedly gained unauthorized access to the content (even if they did not pass the assessment). You may want to have legal resources lined up to help address non-participant parties who may be sharing your assessment content illegally (e.g., so-called “brain dump” sites). Finally, you should have an internal plan in place for what you will do if content is breached. Do you have backup items that can be inserted in the form? Can you release an updated form ahead of your republishing schedule? Will your response be different depending on the extent of the breach?

Web Patrol Monitoring

Several companies offer a web patrol service that will search the internet for pages where your assessment content has been posted without permission. Some of these companies will even purchase unauthorized practice exams that claim to have your assessment content and look for item breaches within them. Some of Questionmark’s partners provide web patrol services.

Statistical Models

There are several publicly available statistical models that can be used to identify abnormalities in participants’ response patterns or matches between a response pattern and a known content breach, such as the key patterns posted on a brain-dump site. Several companies, including some of Questionmark’s partners, have developed their own statistical methods for identifying cases where a participant may have used breached content.

In their chapter in Educational Measurement (4th ed.), Allan Cohen and James Wollack explain that all of these models tend to explore whether the amount of similarity between two sets of responses can be explained by chance alone. For example, one could look for two participants who had similar responses, possibly suggesting collusion or indicating that one participant copied the other. One could also look for similarity between a participant’s responses and the keys given in a leaked assessment form. Models also exist for identifying patterns within groups, as might be the case when a teacher chooses to provide answers to an entire class.

These models are a sophisticated way to look for breaches in content, but they are not foolproof. None of them prove that a participant was cheating, though they can provide weighty statistical evidence. Cohen and Wollack warn that several of the most popular models have been shown to suffer from liberal or conservative Type I error rates, though new models continue to improve in this area.

Item Drift

When considering content breaches, you might also be interested in cases where an item appears to become easier (or harder) for everyone over time. Consider a situation where your participant population has global access to information that changes how they respond to an item. This could be for some unsavory reasons (e.g., a lot of people stole your content), or it could be something benign, like a newsworthy event that caused your population to learn more about content related to your assessment. In these cases, you might expect certain items to become easier for everyone in the population.

To detect whether an item is becoming easier over time, we do not use the p value from Classical Test Theory. Instead, we use Item Response Theory (IRT) and a Differential Item Functioning to detect item drift, which is changes in an item’s IRT parameters over time. This is done with Thissen, Steinberg, and Wainer’s likelihood ratio test that they detailed in Test Validity. Creators of IRT assessments use item parameter drift analyses to see if an item has become easier over time. This information helps test developers make decisions about cycling out items from production or planning new calibration studies.

Interested in learning about item analysis or how-to take your test planning to the next level? I will be presenting a series of workshops at the Questionmark Conference 2016: Shaping the Future of Assessment in Miami, April 12-15. I look forward to seeing you there! Click here to register and learn more about this important learning event. 

 

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