How much do you know about assessment? Quiz 4: Trialling questions

Posted by John Kleeman

Here is the fourth of our series of quizzes on assessment subjects, authored in conjunction with Neil Bachelor of Pure Questions. You can see the first quiz, on Cut Scores here, the second, on Validity and Defensibility here, and the third on use of formative quizzes here.

This week’s quiz is on trialling (or piloting) questions, the important process of checking the questions prior to using them in production.

We regard resources like this quiz as a way of contributing to the ongoing process of learning about assessment. In that spirit, please enjoy the quiz below and feel free to comment if you have any suggestions to improve the questions.

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Questionmark software is very effective for beta testing and trialling questions. You can easily construct a trial assessment containing selected questions for trial delivery, and you can easily schedule certain people to be able to trial. You can also easily change delivery settings, e.g. require secure browser / not require secure browser, require monitoring / not require monitoring to suit the need. Beta questions can also be included within production exams by setting them as “Experimental”, which means that they gather statistics but don’t count to the score of the participant.

Hmmm…What’s in this parcel?

‘This the season, so have some fun with this little gift from Questionmark! Happy Holidays!

Scan the QR code or click here to get started!

How much do you know about assessment? Quiz 3: Use of formative quizzes

Posted by John Kleeman

Here is the third of our series of quizzes on assessment subjects, authored in conjunction with Neil Bachelor of Pure Questions. You can see the first quiz, on Cut Scores, here and the second, on Validity and Defensibility, here.

This week’s quiz is on the use of formative quizzes and assessments.

After some controversy in previous quizzes about the use of negative scores, we are only using positive scores in marking this quiz:  you get 1 point for getting a question right, and 0 points for getting it wrong or skipping it.  Previous quizzes gave a –1 score for getting a question wrong. Try this one and the earlier ones to see which approach you think is easier and which is fairer!

We regard resources like this quiz as a way of contributing to the ongoing process of learning about assessment. In that spirit, please enjoy the quiz below and feel free to comment if you have any suggestions to improve the questions.

How much do you know about assessments? Quiz 2: Validity & Defensibility

Posted by John Kleeman

Here is the second of our series of quizzes on assessment subjects, authored in conjunction with Neil Bachelor of Pure Questions. You can see the first quiz on Cut Scores here.

As always, we regard resources like this quiz as a way of contributing to the ongoing process of learning about assessment. In that spirit, please enjoy the quiz below and feel free to comment if you have any suggestions to improve the questions or the feedback.

Is a longer test likely to be more defensible than a shorter one? Take the quiz and find out.

NOTE: Some people commented on the first quiz that they were surprised to lose marks for getting questions wrong. This quiz uses True/False questions and it is easy to guess at answers, so we’ve set it to subtract a point for each question you get wrong, to illustrate that this is possible. Negative scoring like this encourages you to answer “Don’t Know” rather than guess; this is particularly helpful in diagnostic tests where you want participants to be as honest as possible about what they do or don’t think they know.

Questionmark Live POP Quiz!

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Posted by Jim Farrell

As I traveled around the US this past fall going to Questionmark Breakfast Briefings and User Group Meetings, it was great fun to introduce participants to our new browser-based authoring tool for subject matter experts, Questionmark Live.

Since then I’ve continued spreading the word about this easy authoring tool to Questionmark Nation, so I figure it’s high time for a pop quiz on the subject! This is a low-stakes assessment, so you can just have some fun answering the questions. It’s also “open book,” so you are welcome to look for answers here!

Good luck on the quiz. Please share it with your friends and co-workers! You can try out Questionmark Live for yourself at https://live.questionmark.com. Our software support plan customers use it free of charge, but anyone who wants to experiment with it can sample it for free.

If you are using Questionmark and want to see Questionmark Live in action, come to our bring-your-own laptop Questionmark Live  Item Writing Workshop at the Questionmark Users Conference March 14 – 17 in Miami.

Snap Quiz: Questionmark Live

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Posted by Jim Farrell

Do you think you are an expert at Questionmark Live? See how you stack up answering questions about our browser based question authoring tool.