Infographic: Online or Test-Centre Proctoring?

Julie ProfilePosted by Julie Delazyn

For many exams, candidates are required to travel to brick-and-mortar test centers where proctors (or invigilators) supervise the process; However, a new way of proctoring certification exams is rapidly gaining traction. Two of the world’s largest software companies, SAP and Microsoft, offer online proctoring for their certification programs, and many other companies are looking to follow suit.

Do you need to understand the key differences and benefits? Here’s an infographic that explains some of the pros and cons of the two approaches.

Proctoring Infographic

For more on online proctoring, check out this informational page and video below:

 

 

The Ultimate Guide To Using Assessments for Compliance [eBook]

ebookJulie ProfilePosted by Julie Delazyn

With increasing regulatory requirements, compliance is becoming more and more of a priority for many organizations.

Without regular testing, how do you know what your employees know? And in the case of an audit or an emergency, is it good enough to have had the participant sign off saying that they’ve attended training and understand the content? Most organizations today see online assessments as a critical part of their compliance programs.

Download your complimentary copy of the eBook: Using Assessments for Regulatory Compliance to learn about the most useful applications of assessments in a compliance program and best practice recommendations for using them.

Did your training work? Prove the value of your learning programs with results you can measure

Headshot JuliePosted by Julie Delazyn

Quizzes, tests, and exams do so much more than determine whether or not a learner passed a training course. These assessments, as well as surveys, play a crucial role in learning, performance improvement and regulatory compliance. Check out our most popular white paper: Assessments Through the Learning Process,  which explores the varied and important roles assessments play before, during and after a learning experience.

It’s a great places to start exploring the possibility of using online assessments in education, training, certification or compliance. Learn more about the ways you can use assessments to improve learning and measurement. Download your complimentary copy today.

ATTLP WP cover

Assessments worth their weight in gold?

John Kleeman HeadshotPosted by John Kleeman

Another day, another big fine for a financial institution.

Nothing in this article should be construed as specific criticism of any individual bank, but last week, the United States Federal Reserve Board fined a large investment bank $36m for unauthorized use and disclosure of confidential information. The Board required the bank to:

“submit … an acceptable written plan …for the training of all appropriate … personnel regarding the restrictions, controls and legal requirements governing the use of confidential supervisory information. At minimum, the plan shall include … a requirement that training be conducted and documented no less frequently than annually”

McKinsey & Company have calculated in a report that in the period 2009-Gold bars2014, regulatory fines and settlements have increased by nearly 4500 percent for the top 20 US and EU banks. It used to be that bad loans (credit impairment) were banks’  biggest challenges, but this is now a smaller problem. And whereas regulatory compliance used to be a small part of a bank’s job, it is much more crucial to their operating performance. McKinsey suggest banks need to rethink their response to compliance and make it much more central to their mission.

There are many complex compliance challenges in financial organizations. It is not easy to strike the right balance between giving employees responsibility and incentive to make money, whilst preventing them from misusing that responsibility to take risks that injure the bank.

But ensuring that your employees know, understand and can apply the rules is very achievable. Many banks and other financial institutions use Questionmark technology to deliver regular, trustworthy assessments to their employees — you can see case study examples here. The assessments focus on the specific regulations and duties each employee has, and they also allow assessing understanding of products and job skills.

If you conduct regular online assessments of your employees in this way, you can:

1. Find out if your employees know and understand the rules that apply to them and identify those who don’t.

2. By using scenario questions, also find out if they can apply the rules in practical situations.

3. Gain evidence to demonstrate to regulators that your employees are trained and competent.

4. Provide an incentive to make employees learn the rules, because they know they have to pass the test.

5. You can also save time by allowing knowledgeable employees to “test out” of all-company training on topics they are already expert in.

6. if you require managers as well as employees to pass tests, it demonstrates internally your organization’s commitment to compliance.

7. If you combine regular assessments with other measures, you can help mitigate the risk of regulatory fines.

In their report, McKinsey suggest that firms consider shifting their organizational structure to give compliance a higher and more central profile. If you are running a central compliance function, the ability to assess all your employees and measure directly their understanding of regulations and their ability to meet regulatory needs is a genuinely golden capability.

Questionmark has written a white paper “The Role of Assessments in Mitigating Risk for Financial Services Organizations” which explains the benefits of assessments in mitigating risk and gives good practice in using them as well. You can download the white paper (free with registration) here.Role Mitigating risk_Blog

Data Protection and Privacy: Important developments

Jamie ArmstrongPosted by Jamie Armstrong

As Associate Legal Counsel at Questionmark, I spend a lot of time thinking about data protection and privacy law issues. There have been many important developments over recent months, and I thought it would be interesting for our readers if I summarized just three of these below. I may look at others and/or consider those mentioned here in more detail in a future blog post. With a dedicated in-house technical and legal team, Questionmark is continuously monitoring changes in this field and my role helps to ensure that Questionmark is ahead of the curve in protecting our customers.

1. For around fifteen years, organizations transferring personal data from the European Union to the United States were able to rely on the US-EU Safe Harbor Agreement as a legal basis for such transfers. The Safe Harbor Agreement allowed organizations to self-certify compliance with certain data protection standards. In October 2015, the Court of Justice of the EU invalidated the EU decision that underpinned this arrangement. This meant that organizations transferring relevant data had to review their arrangements to ensure such transfers remained legal by different means, such as the EU Standard Contractual Clauses or Binding Corporate Rules – Safe Harbor can no longer be relied on for transfers of EU personal data to the US.

2. The final text of the new General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) was agreed in April this year, and the GDPR will have legal effect from May 2018. From that date, the GDPR will replace the current Data Protection Directive and will apply in all EU member states without any implementing national law required. This should help multinational organizations with compliance, as there will be more uniformity than there is now. The GDPR includes some new obligations, like requiring appointment of a data protection officer in certain cases, hence the two year lead in period to allow organizations time to prepare. The GDPR is relevant for organizations based outside the EU as it has broader effect when EU personal data processing is involved.

3. After Safe Harbor was invalidated, the US and EU authorities worked together on a replacement, known as the Privacy Shield. The initial agreed text received a cool response in Europe and was subsequently revised to address concerns, including around possible continued surveillance in the US and insufficiency of the Ombudsman role created to consider complaints. It is expected that the mechanics of the Privacy Shield will operate similarly to Safe Harbor (but with stricter requirements), with voluntarily compliance certification to the US Department of Commerce possible from August 1 of this year. Unlike the EU Standard Contractual Clauses and Binding Corporate Rules, the Privacy Shield, as with Safe Harbor, will only apply to transfers of data from the EU to the US. The collective of EU data protection authorities have recently said they will not legally challenge the Privacy Shield for at least a year, to provide an opportunity to gauge how this operates in practice.

With the above representing a very simplified summary of just three important recent developments in the data protection and privacy law field, organizations that control and process personal data clearly need to maintain a heightened level of vigilance to be positioned to respond to the shifting landscape. Check back here for updates on these and other relevant developments in future blog posts.

Disclaimer: This blog post is provided for general information purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. Any views included are personal to me.

For more on Questionmark’s commitment to security, check out the video below:

Predicting Success at Entel Begins with Trustworthy Assessment Results [Case Study]

Julie ProfilePosted by Julie Delazyn

Entel is one of Chile’s largest telecommunications firms, serving both the consumer and commercial sectors. With more than 12,000 employees across its extended Entelenterprise, Entel provides a broad range of mobile and fixed communications services, IT and call center outsourcing and network infrastructure services.

The Challenge

Success in the highly competitive mobile and telecommunications market takes more than world-class infrastructure, great connectivity, an established dealer network and extensive range of retail location. Achieving optimal on-the-job performance yields a competitive edge in the form of satisfied customers, increased revenues and lower costs. Yet actually accomplishing this objective is no small feat – especially for an industry job role notorious for high turnover rates.

With these challenges in mind, Entel embarked on an innovative new strategy to enhance the predictability of the hiring, onboarding, training and developing practices for its nationwide team of 6,000+ retail store and call center representatives.

Certification as a Predictive Metric

Entel conducted an exhaustive analysis – a “big data” initiative that mapped correlations between dozens of disparate data points mined from various business systems, HR systems as well as assessment results – to develop a comprehensive model of the factors contributing to employee performance.

Working with Questionmark OnDemand enabled Entel to create the valid and reliable tests and exams necessary to measure and document representatives’ knowledge, skills and abilities.

Find out more about Entel’s program planning and development, which helped identify and set benchmarks for required knowledge and skills, optimal behaviors and performance metrics, its use of SAP SuccessFactors to manage and monitor performance against many of the key behavioral aspects of the program, as well as the growing role their trustworthy assessment results are having on future product launches and the business as a whole.

Click here to read the full case study.

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