Badging and Assessment: If they know it, let them show it!

Posted by Brian McNamara

We are delighted to announce the availability of Questionmark Badging!

With Questionmark Badging and Questionmark OnDemand, you can grant “badges” to participants based on the outcomes achieved on assessments such as certification exams, post-course tests or advancement exams.Badges associated with Questionmark assessments provide participants with portable, verifiable digital credentials.

Badges aligned with Questionmark assessments can be tied in with competencies and achievements, helping organizations provide recognition and motivation for increasing knowledge and skills. For credentialing and awarding bodies, they can increase the visibility and value of certification programs.

The new app couples Questionmark’s capabilities in delivering valid, reliable and trustworthy assessments with the industry-leading digital credentialing platform from Credly. More than just a visual representation of accomplishment, digital badges provide participants with verifiable, portable credentials that can be shared and displayed across the web, including social networking sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

Find more info about Questionmark Badging right here!

Twelve tips to make questions translation ready

Posted by John Kleeman

We all know the perils of mis-translation. My favourite mis-translation is the perhaps apocryphal tale of a laundry in Rome, Italy putting up a sign in English saying “Ladies, leave your clothes here and spend the afternoon having a good time.” With Questionmark having a translation management system to help you translate questions and assessments, here are some good practice tips on writing questions so they will be easy to translate.

1. Avoid questions that assume syntax is the same in all languages, for example fill-in-blank questions that rely on word order. For example, in English, the verb goes in the middle of a sentence but in Turkish and Korean, the verb is usually at the end of a sentence.

2. Also avoid “broken stem questions”, where the stem is an incomplete sentence and the participant must select the most appropriate answer to finish the sentence. That’s likely to be challenging to translate in some languages where the ordering may not make sense.

3. Keep questions simple. Avoid unnecessarily complex text or question stems with redundancy or unnecessary repetition. Such questions are best simplified before you translate them.

4. Avoid metaphors and idiomatic language in general; things like “in small steps” or “disappear into thin air”, could well introduce translation mistakes.

5. Avoid passive voice where you can. Not all languages make it easy to translate this, and it’s usually best to just use active voice.

6. Thoroughly review questions prior to translation to ensure no ambiguity. if the question wording is ambiguous, the translator’s interpretation of the question may not be the same as that of the question author.

7. If you are using a rating scale across many questions, investigate its cultural appropriateness and, if possible, whether it is widely used in the target language.

8. Test items based on nuances of vocabulary, descriptions of emotions or abstract concepts can be hard to translate, as different languages may have different vocabulary connotations.

9. You also need to be aware of the risk that translating a question could cause a question to become obvious due to different words in the target language, like the following Swedish example.

Question that shows a Swedish translation giving the answer to a question by words being the same

10. Avoid using cultural context within question stimulus. If you are presenting a scenario, make it one that is relevant to different cultures and languages. If it is difficult to avoid a culturally marked context, consider preparing good guidelines for translators in which you define what adaptations are encouraged, desirable and ruled out

11. If your question contains a graphic or video, consider if you can remove any text from it and still keep the question meaningful. Otherwise you need to translate the text in the graphic or video in each language.

12. if you are translating items into several languages, it can be cost effective to conduct a translatability assessment on the items before you do the detailed translation. This will alert to possible issues within various language families prior to doing the more substantial work of full translation. A translatability assessment lets you identify and fix issues early and relatively cheaply. See here for a blog from Steve Dept of CApStAn that explains more.

Thanks to Steve Dept for inspiring this blog post with an excellent conference presentation at EATP last year and for helping me write this article. For some more advice on translating and adapting tests, see the International Test Commission Guidelines for Translating and Adapting Tests or the Cross-cultural Survey Guidelines (CCSG), both of which have been recently updated.

I hope this advice helps you be efficient in your translation efforts. For information on Questionmark OnDemand which includes translation management system capabilities, see www.questionmark.com.

6 Tips for trustworthy compliance assessments

Posted by Chloe Mendonca

If you’re responsible for the development or management of compliance tests you have a heavy responsibility on your shoulders. It’s up to you to ensure your tests are both valid and reliable. We’ve spoken about reliability and validity many times here on the Questionmark blog and these really are two of the keys to ensuring your assessment results can be trusted. If your tests don’t measure what they’re designed to or the content doesn’t reflect the required job knowledge, how can you make defensible decisions on the basis of the results?

This infographic shares 6 tips that you should consider implementing if you haven’t already that will help you to develop trustworthy compliance assessments.

 

Click here to get a hi-res copy of this infographic.

To learn more about developing trustworthy assessments, check out the 26-page Questionmark White Paper “Assessment Results You Can Trust”.

The Ultimate Guide To Using Assessments for Compliance [eBook]

ebookJulie ProfilePosted by Julie Delazyn

With increasing regulatory requirements, compliance is becoming more and more of a priority for many organizations.

Without regular testing, how do you know what your employees know? And in the case of an audit or an emergency, is it good enough to have had the participant sign off saying that they’ve attended training and understand the content? Most organizations today see online assessments as a critical part of their compliance programs.

Download your complimentary copy of the eBook: Using Assessments for Regulatory Compliance to learn about the most useful applications of assessments in a compliance program and best practice recommendations for using them.

7 Strategies to Shrink Satisficing & Improve Survey Results

John Kleeman Headshot

Posted by John Kleeman

My previous post Satisficing: Why it might as well be a four-letter word explained that satisficing on a survey is when someone answers survey questions adequately but not as well as they can. Typically they just fill in questions without thinking too hard. As a commenter on the blog said: “Interesting! I have been guilty of this, didn’t even know it had a name!”

Examples of satisficing behavior are skipping questions or picking the first answer that makes some kind of sense. Satisficing is very common.  As explained in the previous blog, some reasons for it are participants not being motivated to answer well, not having the ability to answer well, them finding the survey too hard or them simply becoming fatigued at too long a survey.

Satisficing is a significant cause of survey error, so here are 7 strategies for a survey author to reduce satisficing:

1. Keep surveys short. Even the keenest survey respondent will get tired in a long survey and most of your respondents will probably not be keen. To get better results, make the survey as short as you possibly can.Bubble-Sheet---Printing-and-Scanning_2

2. Keep questions short and simple. A long and complex question is much more likely to get a poor quality answer.  You should deconstruct complex questions into shorter ones. Also don’t ask about events that are difficult to remember. People’s memory of the past and of the time things happened is surprisingly fragile, and if you ask someone about events weeks or months ago, many will not recall well.

3. Avoid agree/disagree questions. Satisficing participants will most likely just agree with whatever statement you present. For more on the weaknesses of these kind of questions, see my blog on the SAP community network: Strongly Disagree? Should you use Agree/Disagree in survey questions?

4. Similarly remove don’t know options. If someone is trying to answer as quickly as possible, answering that they don’t know is easy for them to do, and avoids thinking about the questions.

5. Communicate the benefit of the survey to make participants want to answer well. You are doing the survey for a good reason.  Make participants believe the survey will have positive benefits for them or their organization. Also make sure each question’s results are actionable. If the participant doesn’t feel that spending the time to give you a good answer is going to help you take some useful action, why should they bother?

6. Find ways to encourage participants to think as they answer. For example, include a request to ask participants to carefully deliberate – it could remind them to pay attention. It can also be helpful to occasionally ask participants to justify their answers – perhaps adding a text comment box after the question explaining why they answered that way. Adding comment boxes is very easy to do in Questionmark software.

7. Put the most important questions early on. Some people will satisfice and they are more likely to do it later on in the survey. If you put the questions that matter most early on, you are more likely to get good results from them.

There is a lot you can do to reduce satisficing and encourage people to give their best answers. I hope these strategies help you shrink the amount of satisficing your survey participants do, and in turn give you more accurate results.

5 Steps to Better Tests

Julie ProfilePosted by Julie Delazyn

Creating fair, valid and reliable tests requires starting off right: with careful planning. Starting with that foundation, you will save time and effort while producing tests that yield trustworthy results.five steps white paper

Five essential steps for producing high-quality tests:

1. Plan: What elements must you consider before crafting the first question? How do you identify key content areas?

2. Create: How do you write items that increase the cognitive load, avoid bias and stereotyping?

3. Build: How should you build the test form and set accurate pass/ fail scores?

4. Deliver: What methods can be implemented to protect test content and discourage cheating?

5. Evaluate: How do you use item-, topic-, and test-level data to assess reliability and improve quality?

Download this complimentary white paper full of best practices for test design, delivery and evaluation.

 

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