Checklists for Test Development

Austin Fossey-42Posted by Austin Fossey

There are many fantastic books about test development, and there are many standards systems for test development, such as The Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. There are also principled frameworks for test development and design, such as evidence-centered design (ECD). But it seems that the supply of qualified test developers cannot keep up with the increased demand for high-quality assessment data, leaving many organizations to piece together assessment programs, learning as they go.checklist

As one might expect, this scenario leads to new tools targeted at these rookie test developers—simplified guidance documents, trainings, and resources attempting to idiot-proof test development. As a case in point, Questionmark seeks to distill information from a variety of sources into helpful, easy-to-follow white papers and blog posts. At an even simpler level, there appears to be increased demand for checklists that new test developers can use to guide test development or evaluate assessments.

For example, my colleague, Bart Hendrickx, shared a Dutch article from the Research Center for Examination and Certification (RCEC) at University of Twente describing their Beoordelingssysteem. He explained that this system provides a rubric for evaluating education assessments in areas like representativeness, reliability, and standard setting. The Buros Center for Testing addresses similar needs for users of mental assessments. In the Assessment Literacy section of their website, Buros has documents with titles like “Questions to Ask When Evaluating a Test”—essentially an evaluation checklist (though Buros also provides their own professional ratings of published assessments). There are even assessment software packages that seek to operationalize a test development checklist by creating a rigid workflow that guides the test developer through different steps of the design process.

The benefit of these resources is that they can help guide new test developers through basic steps and considerations as they build their instruments. It is certainly a step up from a company compiling a bunch of multiple choice questions on the fly and setting a cut score of 70% without any backing theory or test purpose. On the other hand, test development is supposed to be an iterative process, and without the flexibility to explore the nuances and complexities of the instrument, the results and the inferences may fall short of their targets. An overly simple, standardized checklist for developing or evaluating assessments may not consider an organization’s specific measurement needs, and the program may be left with considerable blind spots in its validity evidence.

Overall, I am glad to see that more organizations are wanting to improve the quality of their measurements, and it is encouraging to see more training resources to help new test developers tackle the learning curve. Checklists may be a very helpful tool for a lot of applications, and test developers frequently create their own checklists to standardize practices within their organization, like item reviews.

What do our readers think? Are checklists the way to go? Do you use a checklist from another organization in your test development?

 

 

 

 

One Response to “Checklists for Test Development”

  1. Doug says:

    While not a checklist per se, I always thought Questionmark’s white paper “5 Steps to Better Tests” was a great resource… It could certainly be the basis for building a checklist.

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