FAQ – “Testing Out” of Training

Posted by Kristin Bernor

Let’s explore what it means to “test out”, what the business benefits include and how Questionmark enables you to do this in a simple, timely and valid manner.

“Testing out” of training saves time and money by allowing participants to forego unneeded training. It makes training more valid and respected, and so more likely to impact behavior, because it focuses training on the people who need it and further allows those that do know it, to learn additional knowledge, skills and abilities.

The key to “testing out” of training is that the test properly measures what it is you are training. If that is the case, then if someone can demonstrate by passing the test that they know it already, then they don’t need to do the training. Why testing out can sometimes be a hard sell is if the test doesn’t really measure the same outcomes as the training – so just because you pass the test, you might not in fact know the training. So, the key is to write a good test.

Online assessments are about both staying compliant with regulatory requirements AND giving business value. Assessments help ensure your workforce is competent and reduce risk, but they also give business value in improved efficiency, knowledge and customer service.

What does it mean to “test out” of training?

Many organizations create tests that allow participants to “test out” of training if they pass. Essentially, if you already know the material being taught, then you don’t need to spend time in the training. Testing them on training that is already know is a waste of time, value and resources. Directing them to training that is necessary ensures the candidate is motivated and feels they are spending their time wisely. Everyone wins!

Why is this so important? Or What are the advantages to incorporating “testing out”?

The key advantage of this approach is that you save time when people don’t have to attend the training that they don’t need. Time is money for most organizations, and saving time is an important benefit.

Suppose, for example, you have 1,000 people who need to take some training that lasts 2 hours. This is 2,000 hours of people’s time. Now, suppose you can give a 20-minute test that 25% of people pass and therefore skip the training. The total time taken is 333 hours for the test and 1,500 hours for the training, which adds up to 1,833 hours. So having one-fourth of the test takers skip the training saves 9% of the time that would have been required for everyone to attend the training.

In addition to saving time, using diagnostic tests in this way helps people who attend training courses focus their attention on areas they don’t know well and be more receptive to the training that is beneficial.

Is it appropriate to allow “testing out” of all training?

Obviously if you follow this approach, you’ll need to ensure that your tests are appropriate and sufficient – that they measure the right knowledge and skills that the training would otherwise cover.

You’ll need to check your regulations to confirm that this is permissible for you, but most regulators will see sense here.

How Questionmark can be used to “test out”

Online assessments are a consistent and cost-effective means of validating that your workforce knows the law, your procedures and your products. If you are required to document training, it’s the most reliable way of doing so. When creating and delivering assessments within Questionmark, it’s quite simple to qualify a candidate once they reach a score threshold. If they correctly answer a series of items and pass the assessment, this denotes that further training is not needed. It is imperative that the assessment accurately tests for the requisite knowledge that are part of the training objectives.

The candidate can then focus on training that is pertinent, worthwhile and beneficial to both themselves and the company. If they answer incorrectly and are unable to pass the assessment, then training is necessary until they are able to master the information and demonstrate this in a test.

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