High-stakes assessment: It’s not just about test takers

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In my last post I spent some time defining how I think about the idea of high-stakes assessment. I also talked about how these assessments affect the people who take them including how important it is to their ability to get or do a job.

Now I want to talk a little bit about how these assessments affect the rest of us.

The rest of us

Guess what? The rest of us are affected by the outcomes of these assessments. Did you see that coming?

But seriously, the credentials or scores that result from these assessments affect large swathes of the public. Ultimately that’s the point of high-stakes assessment. The resulting certifications and licenses exist to protect the public. These assessments are acting as barriers preventing incompetent people from practicing professions where competency really matters.

 It really matters

What are some examples of “really matters”? Well, when hiring, it really matters to employers that the network techs they hire knows how to configure a network securely, not that the techs just say they do. It matters to the people crossing a bridge that the engineers who designed it knew their physics. It really matters to every one of us that our doctor, dentist, nurse, or surgeon know what they are doing when they treat us. It really matters to society at large when we measure (well) the children and adults who take large-scale assessments like college entrance exams.

At the end of the day, high-stakes exams are high-stakes because in a very real way, almost all of us have a stake in their outcome.

 Separating the wheat from the chaff

There are a couple of ways that high stakes assessments do what they do. Some assessments are simply designed to measure “minimal competence,” with test takers either ending above the line—often known as “passing”—or below the line. The dreaded “fail.”

Other assessments are designed to place test takers on a continuum of ability. This type of assessment assigns scores to test takers, and the range of
score often appear odd to laypeople. For example, the SAT uses a 200 – 800 scale.

Want to learn more? Hang on till next time!

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