How is the SAP Global Certification program going? A re-interview with SAP’s manager of global certification, part 2.

Posted by Zainab Fayaz

This is the second part of the two-part interview between, John Kleeman, Founder and Executive Director at Questionmark and Ralf Kirchgaessner, Manager of the SAP Global Certification program. This is a continuation of the use of Questionmark software in their Certification in the Cloud program. You can read the first part here. In the second part of the interview, John asks questions about the business benefits of certification and what advice Ralf has for other organizations.

John: What are the business benefits to SAP of certification?

Ralf: There are many benefits to the SAP Global Certification. So, let’s begin from the individual learner’s perspective.

Firstly, earning the SAP Global Certification increases your personal value; not only does it drive personal development; which often leads to increased responsibilities and promotion within your organization, but it also showcases and proves that you stay current and update your skills to the latest releases. Additionally, since 2018, professionals can gain wider recognition through sharing their SAP Global Certification digital badges.

SAP Global Certification is of great value not only for individuals but also for consultancies in the SAP ecosystem. SAP Global Certifications provide a clear measure of a company’s organizational capabilities, which give a competitive advantage, especially if the company has certified professionals in new and innovative areas, like SAP C/4HANA Cloud.

John: What about the customers? What benefits are there for them?

Ralf: Indeed, the most important benefit is the value for our customers. If SAP can ensure that the consultancy eco-system is well enabled and certified, it helps reduce the total cost of ownership (TCO) and ensures successful implementation costs. And in the end, this is of course also important for SAP, as this helps to increase the adoption of our software and reduces implementation risks.

John: Tell me a bit more about the recently introduced digital badges for people who get certified that you just mentioned. How useful is that?

Ralf: The introduction of digital badges for SAP Global Certification has been an absolute success! Making your workforce visible on the market is important and by sharing the digital badge proves that the workforce is currently in their knowledge. If on LinkedIn, you search for ‘certified SAP consultants’, you would find thousands of shared badges. Digital badge claim rates beyond industry standards show that people waited with much anticipation to share their achievements digitally.

We are constantly looking for ways to improve our services and with the help of Questionmark, going forward we will be able to issue badges, even faster. In the near future, once candidates have passed their SAP Global Certification exam this will trigger the issuing of badges in “real-time”!

We have reached our ultimate goal and an overall mission of our certification programme if customers ask consultants for their digital badges to show their SAP Global Certification status.

John: There seems a slow move across the community from test centers to online proctoring. I know that for SAP, you deliver some exams in your offices but most in the cloud with online proctoring. How do you see this changing in the industry in general? Will all IT exams be done by online proctoring one day soon?

Ralf: SAP very much uses the model of taking exams wherever and whenever it is most convenient. Nevertheless, we use one harmonized infrastructure, for all our exams and these can be taken at our offices, in classrooms or in the cloud.

I think much of this evolves from the changing landscape in learning behaviors and offerings. In terms of the advantages of using test centers and online proctoring; there is a legitimate reason for test centres to exist; as there are groups of people who will still want to learn together – in one place at one time. However, as the shift moves towards a rise in remote learning, both synchronous (live virtual classrooms) and asynchronous, which are supported by social and peer learning via online learning rooms, then of course, online proctoring will become more popular.

John: What advice would you give to other high-tech companies who are thinking of setting up or improving their certification program?

Ralf: Two things instantly come to mind – online proctoring and digital badging. Certification programs that do not use online proctoring and digital badging should urgently consider improving their program as the benefits of implementing both features are tremendous.

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