Intro to high-stakes assessment

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Hello, and welcome to my first blog post for Questionmark. I joined Questionmark in May of 2014 but have just recently become Product Owner for Authoring. That means I oversee the tools we build to help people like you write their questions and assessments.

My professional background in assessment is mostly in the realm of high-stakes testing. That means I’ve worked with organizations that license, certify, or otherwise credential individuals. These include medical/nursing boards, driving standards organizations, software/hardware companies, financial services, and all sorts of sectors where determining competency is important.

With that in mind, I thought I’d kick off my blogging career at Questionmark with a series of posts on the topic of high-stakes assessment.

Now that I’ve riveted your attention with that awesome and no-at-all tedious opening you’re naturally chomping at the bit to learn more, right?

Right?

Read on!

High-stakes assessment defined

I think of a high-stakes assessment as having the following traits:

It strongly influences or determines an individual’s ability to practice a profession

Organizations that administer high-stakes assessments operate along a continuum of influence. For example, certifications from SAP or other IT organizations are typically viewed as desirable by employers and may be used as a differentiator when hiring or setting compensation, but are not necessarily required for employment. At the other end of the continuum we have organizations that actually determine a person’s ability to practice a profession. An example is that you must be licensed by a state bar association to practice law in a US state. In between these extremes lie many shades of influence. The key concept here is that the influence is real…from affecting hiring/promotion decisions to flat-out determining if a person can be hired or continue to work in their chosen profession.

It awards credentials that belong to the individual

This is all about scope and ownership. These credentialing organizations almost always award a license/certification to the individual. If you get certified by SAP, that certification is yours even if your employer paid for it.

Speaking about scope, that certificate represents skills that are employer-neutral, and in the case of most IT certifications, the skills are generally unbounded by region as well. A certification acquired in the United States means the same thing in Canada, in Russia, in Mongolia, in Indonesia in…you get the point.

Stan Lee

Okay, so these organizations influence who can work in professions and who can’t. Big whoop, right? Right! It really is a big whoop.

As Stan Lee has told us repeatedly, “Excelsior!”

Hmmm. That’s not the quote I wanted.

I meant, as Stan Lee has told us repeatedly, “With great power comes great responsibility!”*

And these orgs do have great power. They also, in many cases, have powerful members. For example, medical boards in the United States certify elite medical professionals. In all cases, these orgs are simultaneously making determinations about the public good and people’s livelihoods. As a result, they tend to take the process very seriously.

Ok… But what does it all mean?

Glad you asked. Stay tuned for my next post to find out.

Till then, Excelsior!

* So, it turns out that some guy named “Voltaire” said this first. But really, who’s had a bigger impact on the world? Voltaire – if that’s even his real
name – or Stan Lee? 🙂

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