Item Development – Conducting the final editorial review

Austin Fossey-42Posted by Austin Fossey

Once you have completed your content review and bias review, it is best to conduct a final editorial review.

You may have already conducted an editorial review prior to the content and bias reviews to cull items with obvious item-writing flaws or inappropriate item types—so by the time you reach this second editorial review, your items should only need minor edits.

This is the time to put the final polish on all of your items. If your content review committee and bias review committee were authorized to make changes to the items, go back and make sure they followed your style guide and that they used accurate grammar and spelling. Make sure they did not make any drastic changes that violate your test specifications, such as adding a fourth option to a multiple choice item that should only have three options.

If you have resources to do so, have professional editors review the items’ content. Ask the editors to identify issues with language, but review their suggestions rather than letting them make direct edits to the items. The editors may suggest changes that violate your style guide, they may not be familiar with language that is appropriate for your industry, or they may wish to make a change that would drastically impact the item content. You should carefully review their changes to make sure they are each appropriate.

As with other steps in the item development process, documentation and organization is key. Using item writing software like that provided by Questionmark can help you track revisions to items, document changes, and track your items to make sure each one is reviewed.

Do not approve items with a rubber stamp. If an item needs major content revisions, send it back to the item writers and begin the process again. Faulty items can undermine the validity of your assessment and can result in time-consuming challenges from participants. If you have planned ahead, you should have enough extra items to allow for some attrition while retaining enough items to meet your test specifications.

Finally, be sure that you have the appropriate stakeholders sign off on each item. Once the item passes this final editorial review, it should be locked down and considered ready to deliver to participants. Ideally, no changes should be made to items once they are in delivery, as this may impact how participants respond to the item and perform on the assessment. (Some organizations require senior executives to review and approve any requested changes to items that are already in delivery.)

When you are satisfied that the items are perfect, they are ready to be field tested. In the next post, I will talk about item try-outs, selecting a field test sample, assembling field test forms, and delivering the field test.

Check out our white paper: 5 Steps to Better Tests for best practice guidance and practical advice for the five key stages of test and exam development.

Austin Fossey will discuss test development at the 2015 Users Conference in Napa Valley, March 10-13. Register before Jan. 29 and save $100.

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