Item Development – Summary and Conclusions

Austin Fossey-42Posted by Austin Fossey

This post concludes my series on item development in large-scale assessment. I’ve discussed some key processes in developing items, including drafting items, reviewing items, editing items, and conducting an item analysis. The goal of this process is to fine-tune a set of items so that test developers have an item pool from which they can build forms for scored assessment while being confident about the quality, reliability, and validity of the items. While the series covered a variety of topics, there are a couple of key themes that were relevant to almost every step.

First, documentation is critical, and even though it seems like extra work, it does pay off. Documenting your item development process helps keep things organized and helps you reproduce processes should you need to conduct development again. Documentation is also important for organization and accountability. As noted in the posts about content review and bias review, checklists can help ensure that committee members consider a minimal set of criteria for every item, but they also provide you with documentation of each committee member’s ratings should the item ever be challenged. All of this documentation can be thought of as validity evidence—it helps support your claims about the results and refute rebuttals about possible flaws in the assessment’s content.

The other key theme is the importance of recruiting qualified and representative subject matter experts (SMEs). SMEs should be qualified to participate in their assigned task, but diversity is also an important consideration. You may want to select item writers with a variety of experience levels, or content experts who have different backgrounds. Your bias review committee should be made up of experts who can help identify both content and response bias across the demographic areas that are pertinent to your population. Where possible, it is best to keep your SME groups independent so that you do not have the same people responsible for different parts of the development cycle. As always, be sure to document the relevant demographics and qualifications of your SMEs, even if you need to keep their identities anonymous.

This series is an introduction for organizing an item development cycle, but I encourage readers to refer to the resources mentioned in the articles for
more information. This series also served as the basis for a session at the 2015 Questionmark Users Conference, which Questionmark customers can watch in the Premium section of the Learning Café.

You can link back to all of the posts in this series by clicking on the links below, and if you have any questions, please comment below!

Item Development – Managing the Process for Large-Scale Assessments

Item Development – Training Item Writers

Item Development – Five Tips for Organizing Your Drafting Process

Item Development – Benefits of editing items before the review process

Item Development – Organizing a content review committee (Part 1)

Item Development – Organizing a content review committee (Part 2)

Item Development – Organizing a bias review committee (Part 1)

Item Development – Organizing a bias review committee (Part 2)

Item Development – Conducting the final editorial review

Item Development – Planning your field test study

Item Development – Psychometric review

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