Job Task Analysis Surveys Legally Required?

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Posted by John Kleeman

I had a lot of positive feedback on my blog post Making your Assessment Valid: 5 Tips from Miami. There is a lot of interest in how to ensure your assessment is valid, ensuring that it measures what it is supposed to measure.

If you are assessing for competence in a job role or for promotion into a job role, one critical step in making your assessment valid is to have a good, current analysis of what knowledge, skills and abilities are needed to do the job role. This is called a job task analysis (JTA), and the most common way of doing this analysis is to conduct a JTA Survey.

Job Task Analysis SurveyIn a JTA Survey, you ask existing people in the job role, or other experts, what tasks they do. A common practice is to survey them on how important each task is, how difficult it is and how often it is done. The resultant reports then guide the construction of the test blueprint and which topics and how many questions on each you include in the test.

If you cannot show that your assessment matches the requirements of a job, then your assessment is not only invalid but it is likely unfair — if you use it to select people for the job or measure competence in the job. And if you use an invalid assessment to select people for promotion or recruitment into the job, you may face legal action from people you reject.

Not only is this common sense, but it was also confirmed by a recent US district court ruling against the Boston Police Department. In this court case, sergeants who had been rejected for promotion to lieutenant following an exam sued that the assessment was unfair, and won.

The judge ruled that the exam was not sufficiently valid, because it omitted many job skills crucial for a police lieutenant role, and so it was not fair to be used to select for the role (see news report).

The 82-page judge’s ruling sets out in detail why the exam was unfair. He references the Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures which state:

“There should be a job analysis which includes an analysis of the important work behavior(s) required for successful performance and their relative importance”

But the judge ruled that although a job analysis had been done, it had not been used properly in the test construction process. He said:

“When using a multiple choice exam, the developer must convert the job analysis result into a test plan to ensure a direct and strong relationship between the job analysis and the exam.

However, in this case, the job analysis was not used sufficiently well to construct the exam. The judge went on to say:

The Court cannot find, however, that the test plan ensured a strong relationship between the job analysis and the exam. … too many skills and abilities were missing from the … test outline. 

Crucially, he concluded:

“And a high score on the … exam simply was not a good indicator that a candidate would be a good lieutenant”.

Due to the pace of business change and technological advance, job roles are changing fast. Make sure that you conduct regular JTAs  of roles in your organization and make sure your assessments match the most important job tasks. Find out more about Job Task Analysis here.

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