Making your Assessment Valid: 5 Tips from Miami

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Posted by John Kleeman

A key reason people use Questionmark’s assessment management system is that it helps you make more valid assessments. To remind you, a valid assessment is one that genuinely measures what it is supposed to measure. Having an effective process to ensure your assessments are valid, reliable and trustable was an important topic at Questionmark Conference 2016 in Miami last week. Here is some advice I heard:

Reporting back from 3 days of learning and networking at Questionmark Conference 2016 in Miami

Tip 1: Everything starts from the purpose of your assessment. Define this clearly and document it well. A purpose that is not well defined or that does not align with the needs of your organization will result in a poor test. It is useful to have a formal process to kick off  a new assessment to ensure the purpose is defined clearly and is aligned with business needs.

Tip 2: A Job Task Analysis survey is a great way of defining the topics/objectives for new-hire training assessments. One presenter at the conference sent out a survey to the top performing 50 percent of employees in a job role and asked questions on a series of potential job tasks. For each job task, he asked how difficult it is (complexity), how important it is (priority) and how often it is done (frequency). He then used the survey results to define the structure of knowledge assessments for new hires to ensure they aligned with needed job skills.

Tip 3: The best way to ensure that a workplace assessment starts and remains valid is continual involvement with Subject Matter Experts (SMEs). They help you ensure that the content of the assessment matches the content needed for the job and ensure this stays the case as the job changes. It’s worth investing in training your SMEs in item writing and item review. Foster a collaborative environment and build their confidence.

Tip 4: Allow your participants (test-takers) to feed back into the process. This will give you useful feedback to improve the questions and the validity of the assessment. It’s also an important part of being transparent and open in your assessment programme, which is useful because people are less likely to cheat if they feel that the process is well-intentioned. They are also less likely to complain about the results being unfair. For example it’s useful to write an internal blog explaining why and how you create the assessments and encourage feedback.

Lunch with a view at Questionmark Conference 2016 in Miami

Tip 5: As the item bank grows and as your assessment programme becomes more successful, make sure to manage the item bank and review items. Retire items that are no longer relevant or when they have been overexposed. This keeps the item bank useful, accurate and valid.

There was lots more at the conference – excitement that Questionmark NextGen authoring is finally here, a live demo of our new easy to use Printing and Scanning solution … and having lunch on the hotel terrace in the beautiful Miami spring sunshine – with Questionmark branded sunglasses to keep cool.

There was a lot of buzz at the conference about documenting your assessment decisions and making sure your assessments validly measure job competence. There is increasing understanding that assessment is a process not a project, and also that to be used to measure competence or to select for a job role, an assessment must cover all important job tasks.

I hope these tips on making assessments valid are helpful. Click here for more information on Questionmark’s assessment management system.

3 Responses to “Making your Assessment Valid: 5 Tips from Miami”

  1. Dr Basim Al-Samarrai says:

    The topic is interesting but it is not easy. in practical I had difficulty with tip 2 and the problem was how to analyze data that I collected about every task answering the three questions complexity, priority. and frequency. Please I need help to solve this problem
    Dr Basim

  2. Julie Delazyn John Kleeman says:

    Thank you for your comment. A good place to look for some initial guidance is the Shrock & Coscorelli book on Criterion Referenced Test Design. The Questionmark reports should help considerably with the analysis – if you’ve been using those and still having a challenge, could you reach out to me at john at questionmark.com as I’d love to hear more.

  3. Dr. Basim, you may find that there is no need to try and document “the three questions.” If you can get the SMEs to identify the job skills alone you can start with that, and make incrementally strategic decisions about sampling items to create your assessment.

    Bill Coscarelli

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