Establishing a data-driven assessment strategy – A Q&A with Amazon

Headshot Julie

Posted by Julie Delazyn

Jason Sunseri is a senior Program Manager – Learning Technology at Amazon. He will be leading a discussion at Questionmark Conference 2016 in Miami, about Creating a Global Knowledge and Skills Assessment Program for Amazon Sellers.

Jason Sunseri, Program Manager – Learning Technology, Amazon

Jason’s session will look at how Amazon Seller Support and Questionmark OnDemand have partnered to deliver a world-class solution. Jason will illustrate how Amazon has used the OnDemand platform to deliver a robust, data-driven assessment strategy.

I recently asked him about his session:

Tell me about Amazon and its use of assessments:

Amazon Seller Support engages with the 2.5 million+ global sellers represented on the Amazon platform. Due to rapid global expansion across the platform, the Amazon Seller Support needed to find a technology and assessment partner that could support both its knowledge and skill acquisition assessment strategies.

How does Amazon use data to drive strategy?

Assessments play a huge role at Amazon. We have really evolved into a data-driven culture and we use assessments in surveys and inside curriculum to assess training and performance, and to identify early issues and trends in order to tweak training content and fix errors.

What role does Questionmark play in that strategy?

We rely heavily on reports — Survey Matrix, Job Task Analysis and other report functions — to assess performance. We’re able to leverage the tool by having individual training centers analyze learning and training gaps and pass on those results. It allows us to see how and why a site is succeeding; where that behavior stems from — it’s really cool to see.

What are you looking forward to at the conference?

It’s Miami, so…the weather, for sure! In all seriousness, I look forward to learning about how other Questionmark users utilize the same tools and how their approach varies from ours.

Thank you, Jason for taking time out of your busy schedules to discuss your session with us!

Installing Perception in Amazon’s Cloud – Part 1

Posted bySteve Lay

In my last post, I wandered lonely as a virtual machine – with apologies to William Wordsworth, I introduced the idea of cloud-based computing and some of the reasons why so many server rooms are being ‘virtualized’.

Many of our OnPremise customers are already using virtual machines to run their Questionmark Perception servers.  Here at Questionmark we make extensive use of virtual machines; setting them up is quick and easy to do, making them ideal for testing out new versions of software or developing and testing integrations developed using our Application Programming Interfaces such as QMWISe.

In this tutorial, I introduce system administrators and developers to Amazon’s cloud-based computing service EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud) and show how to launch a virtual machine suitable for installing Perception.

Next time I’ll be looking at using Remote Desktop to gain access to your virtual machines and how to configure them ready to install Perception.

I wandered lonely as a virtual machine – with apologies to William Wordsworth

Over the next few months I’m going to be taking a closer look at how to set up Questionmark Perception on cloud-based virtual machines.  I’ll be writing some tutorials aimed at system administrators and integration developers.  I’ll show you, in detail, how to install and configure Perception in Amazon’s cloud and how to use it to test your own integrations.

But first: what are virtual machines, and why do they form clouds?

Ten years ago you could walk into a typical data centre and locate the physical machine that was running your application. You could walk around the server room and do a quick scan of the flashing LEDs to get a dashboard-like view of your running applications. Sometimes a big server would be shared between multiple applications, but sharing the operating system, web server and other common components was error prone and things quickly got complicated!

Today, data centres are often just populated with anonymous machines that combine to form a cloud of computing resources. Each application is installed on its own virtual machine with its own virtual operating system. Virtual machines ‘float’ in the cloud, wandering transparently between the physical machines as required.

One of the main advantages of virtualization is that it enables resources to be used more efficiently. When an application is inactive, the physical resources it was using can be quickly recycled, saving energy and helping ensure that future generations can also enjoy the “vales and hills” that Wordsworth once wandered through.

One of the most popular computing clouds is Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud, known as Amazon EC2 for short.  Virtual machines in Amazon’s EC2 are rented out to Amazon account holders on an hour-by-hour basis for just a few dollars.

The physical machines that make up the cloud are distributed around the world in Amazon’s data centres.  But clouds can be private too.  Software for virtualization is available from well known suppliers like VMWare and Microsoft allowing companies to create private clouds in their own data centres.  There is even an open source cloud platform called Eucalyptus.

The easiest way to get going with Questionmark Perception is with our OnDemand solution, but if you need an OnPremise solution you might already be thinking of installing Perception on your own cloud based-systems. This is a subject I’ll be covering in more detail later.