Six predictions now the GDPR is in place

So the European GDPR is in place now. Questionmark like most other companies has been working hard in the last two years to ensure we are compliant and that our customers in and outside Europe can be compliant with the GDPR. See our trust center or summary for information on Questionmark’s compliance.

Is it all done and dusted? My email inbox seems to have a few less promotional emails in it. But is this because of the holiday weekend or have companies really taken my name off their mailing lists? Here are six predictions for what we’ll see going forwards with the GDPR.

1. The May 25th 2018 date will matter much less going forwards than backwards

A picture of a dog with a Christmas hatCompanies have been rushing to meet the May 25th date, but GDPR and privacy is a destination not a journey. There is a famous slogan “a dog is for life not just for Christmas” encouraging people to look after their dog and not just buy it as a cute puppy. Similarly the GDPR is not just something you get compliant with and then ignore. You need to include privacy and compliance in your processes forever.

No one will care much whether you were compliant on May 25th 2018. But everyone will care whether you are meeting their privacy needs and following the law when they interact with you.

2. History will judge the GDPR as a watershed moment where privacy became more real

Nevertheless I do think that history will judge the GDPR as being a seminal moment for privacy. Back in the early 2000s, Microsoft popularized the concept of security by design and security by default when they delayed all their products for a year as they improved their security. Nowadays almost everyone builds security into their systems and makes it the default because you have to to survive.

Similarly the GDPR encourages us to think of privacy when we design products and to make privacy the default not an afterthought. For example, when we collect data, we should plan how long to keep it and how to erase it later. I suspect in ten years time, privacy by design will be as commonplace as security by design – and the GDPR will be the key reason it became popular.

3. Many other jurisdictions will adopt GDPR like laws

Although the GDPR is over-complex, it has some great concepts in it, that I’m sure other countries will adopt. It is appropriate that organizations have to take care about processing peoples’ data. It is appropriate that when you pass people’s data onto a third party, there should be safeguards. And if you breach that data, it is appropriate that you should have to be held accountable.

We can expect lawmakers in other countries to make GDPR-like laws.

4. Supply chain management will become more important

Diagram showing one data controller with two data processors. One data processor has two sub-processors and one data processor has one sub-processorUnder the GDPR, a Data Controller contracts with Data Processors and those Data Processors must disclose their Sub-processors (sub-contractors). There is positive encouragement to choose expert Data Processors and Sub-processors and there are consequences if processors fail their customers. This will encourage organizations to choose reputable suppliers and to review processors down the chain to make sure that everyone is following the rules. Choosing suppliers and Sub-processors that get themselves audited for security, e.g. under ISO 27001, is going to become more commonplace.

This will mean that some suppliers who do not have good enough processes in place for security, privacy and reliability will struggle to survive.

5. People will be the biggest cause of compliance failures

Organizations set up processes and procedures and put in place systems and technology to run their operations, but people are needed to design and run those processes and technology. Some GDPR compliance failures are going to be down to technology failures, but I predict the majority will be down to people. People will make mistakes or judgement errors and cause privacy and GDPR breaches.

If you are interested in this subject, Amanda Maguire of SAP and I gave a webinar last week entitled “GDPR is almost here – are your people ready?” which should shortly be available to view on the SAP website. The message we shared is that if you want to stay compliant with the GDPR, you need to check your people know what to do with personal data. Testing them regularly is a good way of checking their knowledge and understanding.

6. The GDPR and privacy concerns will encourage more accurate assessments

Last but not least, I think that the GDPR will encourage people to expect more accurate and trustworthy tests and exams. The GDPR requires that we pay attention to the accuracy of personal data; “every reasonable step must be taken to ensure that personal data that are inaccurate … are erased or rectified without delay”.

There is a strong argument this means that if someone creates a test or exam to measure competence, that the assessment should be accurate in what it claims to measure. So it needs to be authored using appropriate procedures to make it valid, reliable and trustworthy. If someone takes an assessment which is invalid or unfair, and fails it, they might reasonably argue that the results are not an accurate indication of their competence and so that personal data is inaccurate and needs correcting.

For some help on how you can make more accurate assessments, check out Questionmark white papers at www.questionmark.com/learningresources including “Assessment Results You Can Trust”.

 

 

U.S. Privacy Shield: Data protection and security

Jamie ArmstrongPosted by Jamie Armstrong

Earlier this year I wrote blog post that summarized some important recent data protection and privacy law developments. Today, I wanted to follow up on that posting by looking particularly at the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield (“Privacy Shield”).

The Privacy Shield came into being to fill the void left by the invalidation of the European Commission decision underpinning the US-EU Safe Harbor Agreement (“Safe Harbor”). From August this year, US organizations have been able to certify compliance to the Privacy Shield – the list of those certified organizations can be viewed here. Questionmark Corporation has certified to the Privacy Shield, and you can view our updated privacy policy here. As was the case for Questionmark’s self-certification to Safe Harbor, our compliance with the Privacy Shield principles is just part of Questionmark’s broader strategy to ensure that relevant international data transfers conform to applicable legal requirements.privcy-shield

The Privacy Shield, as well as other mechanisms such as the EU Model Clauses, provides a way for organizations to comply with EU data protection requirements when personal data is transferred to the US from the EU. Remember that whereas the EU Model Clauses may be relied on for transfers of EU personal data to third countries (i.e. those that are not part of the EEA), the scope of the Privacy Shield is limited to personal data transfers to the US.

The European Commission has produced a helpful guide on the Privacy Shield, aimed at EU citizens, with some key improvements as compared with Safe Harbor being:

  • Greater oversight and monitoring by authorities in the US and EU to ensure compliance, for example by the US Department of Commerce, Department of Transport and Federal Trade Commission;
  • A greater number of ways for individuals to make complaints to enforce their rights without cost, including to an Ombudsman within the US Department of State, via an EU Data Protection Authority, an independent recourse mechanism, and binding arbitration;
  • Additional obligations for participant organizations, like ensuring any third-party transferees provide the same level of protection for personal data as is required by the Privacy Shield.

Although the Privacy Shield includes a number of additional protections for individuals and obligations on organizations, some interest groups remain unconvinced that it is meaningfully different to Safe Harbor and legal challenges in the EU have already been made. With this in mind, organizations that have certified to or may certify to the Privacy Shield will have to monitor EU developments and continue to review their data protection and privacy approaches, so that they are satisfied that there are a sufficient number of means available to them to show adequate protection for EU personal data being transferred to the US. Questionmark’s Privacy Shield certification demonstrates to customers our particular commitment to data protection and security in respect of applicable data.

Check back here for future blog posts on data protection and privacy law issues early next year.

Disclaimer: This blog is provided for general information purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. Any views included are personal to me.