SAP to present their global certification program at London briefing

Chloe MendoncaPosted by Chloe Mendonca

A key to SAP’s success is ensuring that the professional learning path of skilled SAP practitioners is continually supported – thereby making qualified experts on their cloud solutions readily available to customers, partners and consultants.

In a world where current knowledge and skills are more important than ever, SAP needed a way to verify that their cloud consultants around the world were keeping their knowledge and skills up-to-date  with rapidly changing technology. A representative of the certification program at SAP comments:breakfast briefing

It became clear that a certification that lasted for two or three years didn’t cut it any longer – in all areas of the portfolio. Everything is evolving so quickly, and SAP has to always support current, validated knowledge.”

Best Practices from SAP

The move to the cloud required some fundamental changes to SAP’s existing certification program. What challenges did they face? What technologies are they using to ensure the security of the program? Join us on the 21st of October for a breakfast briefing in London, where Ralf Kirchgaessner, Manager of Global Certification at SAP, will discuss the answers to these questions. Ralf will tell how the SAP team planned for the program, explain its benefits and share lessons learned.

Click here to learn more and register for this complimentary breakfast briefing *Seats are limited

High-Stakes Assessments

The briefing will  include a best-practice seminar on the types of technologies and techniques to consider using as part of your assessment program to securely create, deliver and report on high-stakes tests around the world. It will highlight technologies such as online invigilation, secure browsers and item banking tools that alleviate the testing centre burden and allow organisations and test publishers to securely administer trustable tests and exams and protect valuable assessment content.

What’s a breakfast briefing?

You can expect a morning of networking, best practice tips and live demonstrations of the newest assessment technologies.The event will include a complimentary breakfast at 8:45 a.m. followed by presentations and discussions until about 12:30 p.m.

Who should attend?

These gatherings are ideal for people involved in certification, compliance and/or risk management, and learning and development.

When? Where?

Wednesday 21st October at Microsoft’s Office in London, Victoria — 8:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m

Click here to learn more and register to attend

Intro to high-stakes assessment

Lance bio pic  Posted by

Hello, and welcome to my first blog post for Questionmark. I joined Questionmark in May of 2014 but have just recently become Product Owner for Authoring. That means I oversee the tools we build to help people like you write their questions and assessments.

My professional background in assessment is mostly in the realm of high-stakes testing. That means I’ve worked with organizations that license, certify, or otherwise credential individuals. These include medical/nursing boards, driving standards organizations, software/hardware companies, financial services, and all sorts of sectors where determining competency is important.

With that in mind, I thought I’d kick off my blogging career at Questionmark with a series of posts on the topic of high-stakes assessment.

Now that I’ve riveted your attention with that awesome and no-at-all tedious opening you’re naturally chomping at the bit to learn more, right?

Right?

Read on!

High-stakes assessment defined

I think of a high-stakes assessment as having the following traits:

It strongly influences or determines an individual’s ability to practice a profession

Organizations that administer high-stakes assessments operate along a continuum of influence. For example, certifications from SAP or other IT organizations are typically viewed as desirable by employers and may be used as a differentiator when hiring or setting compensation, but are not necessarily required for employment. At the other end of the continuum we have organizations that actually determine a person’s ability to practice a profession. An example is that you must be licensed by a state bar association to practice law in a US state. In between these extremes lie many shades of influence. The key concept here is that the influence is real…from affecting hiring/promotion decisions to flat-out determining if a person can be hired or continue to work in their chosen profession.

It awards credentials that belong to the individual

This is all about scope and ownership. These credentialing organizations almost always award a license/certification to the individual. If you get certified by SAP, that certification is yours even if your employer paid for it.

Speaking about scope, that certificate represents skills that are employer-neutral, and in the case of most IT certifications, the skills are generally unbounded by region as well. A certification acquired in the United States means the same thing in Canada, in Russia, in Mongolia, in Indonesia in…you get the point.

Stan Lee

Okay, so these organizations influence who can work in professions and who can’t. Big whoop, right? Right! It really is a big whoop.

As Stan Lee has told us repeatedly, “Excelsior!”

Hmmm. That’s not the quote I wanted.

I meant, as Stan Lee has told us repeatedly, “With great power comes great responsibility!”*

And these orgs do have great power. They also, in many cases, have powerful members. For example, medical boards in the United States certify elite medical professionals. In all cases, these orgs are simultaneously making determinations about the public good and people’s livelihoods. As a result, they tend to take the process very seriously.

Ok… But what does it all mean?

Glad you asked. Stay tuned for my next post to find out.

Till then, Excelsior!

* So, it turns out that some guy named “Voltaire” said this first. But really, who’s had a bigger impact on the world? Voltaire – if that’s even his real
name – or Stan Lee? 🙂

Podcast: Assessments for workers all across the globe

Bon Crowder

 

Posted by Joan Phaup

I spent some time talking the other day with Bon Crowder, a global instructional consultant for a large oilfield services company. She explained how her organization has expanded its use of online assessments to include not only high-stakes exams and certifications but also formative assessments such as quizzes.  With participants all over the world — and having recently launched an assessment to 40,000 people — Bon’s organization values the ability to gather and analyze data that will help improve instructional programs.

We touched on many subjects, including the involvement of subject matter experts (SMEs) in using Questionmark Live to create assessment content, options for monitoring some higher-stakes assessments taken outside of  testing centers, and a technique Bon has devised for easily creating multiple math-related questions from a single question stem.

4 Tips to Help Ensure the Security of Intellectual Property

julie-smallPosted by Julie Chazyn

Protecting the intellectual property contained in a test or exam is essential, not only because of the time, effort and cost of creating assessments but also because IP theft undermines the accurate measurement of knowledge and skills.

Protecting intellectual property protects the credibility of tests. Here are four tips for helping to ensure the security of intellectual property:

Create and administer multiple test forms

Rather than having only one form of the assessment being administered, delivering multiple forms of the same exam can help limit item exposure. This method also allows for the possibility of interspersing large-scale integrated beta test questions within the forms to collect psychometric information on newly developed questions.

Restrict and control administration of beta test items

Beta testing questions is an important part of high-stakes assessment, ensuring the psychometric quality of questions before they appear on actual assessments. However, it is vital that a well conceptualized beta test model is in effect to limit the exposure of newly developed questions to participants.

Update exam forms periodically

Letting exam forms become stale can over-expose questions to participants, increasing the likelihood of IP theft. An organization could consider retiring old exam forms and turning them into exam prep materials that can be sold to participants. In this way, participants could periodically expect new practice questions.

Produce exam prep materials

Organizations should consider making exam prep materials available to participants before an assessment. This will help reduce the demand for participants to try to obtain exam questions via illegal means as they will have access to the type of questions that will be asked on the actual assessment.

For more details on this subject, plust information about various means for deploying a wide range of assessment types with assurance, download our White Paper: Delivering Assessments Safely and Securely.