Workplace Exams 101: How to Prevent Cheating

John Kleeman

Posted by John Kleeman

A hot topic in the assessment world today is cheating and what to do to prevent it. Many organizations test their employees, contractors and other personnel to check their competence and skills. These include compliance tests, on-boarding tests, internal certification tests, end-of-course tests and product knowledge quizzes.

There are two reasons why cheating matters in workplace exams:

Issue #1: Validity

Firstly, the validity of the test or exam is compromised; any decision made as a result of the test is invalid. For example, you may use a test to check whether someone is safe to sell your products, but if cheating happens, then he/she is not. Or you may be checking if someone is safe to do a task, and if cheating happens, safety is compromised. Tests and exams are used to make important decisions about people with business, financial and regulatory consequences. If someone cheats at a test or exam, you are making the decision based on bad data.

Issue #2: Integrity

Secondly, people who cheat at tests or exams have demonstrated a lack of integrity. If they will cheat on a test or exam, what else might they lie, cheat or defraud your organization about? Will falsifying a record or report be next? Regulators often have rules requiring integrity and have sanctions if someone demonstrates a lack of it.

For example, in the financial sector, FINRA’s Rule 2010 requires individuals to “observe high standards of commercial honor” and is used to ban people found cheating at exams or continuing education tests. In the accountancy sector, both AICPA and CIMA require accountants to have integrity and those found cheating at tests have been banned or otherwise sanctioned. And in the medical and pharmaceutical field, regulators have codes of conduct which include honesty. For example, the UK General Medical Council requires doctors to “always be honest about your experience, qualifications and current role” and interprets cheating at exams as a violation of this.

The well-respected International Test Commission Guidelines on the Security of Tests, Exams and Other Assessments suggests six categories of cheating threats shown below, alongside examples from me of how they can take place in the work environment.


ITC categoriesTypical examples in the workplace
Using test content pre-knowledge– An employee takes the test and passes questions to a colleague still to take it
– Someone authoring questions leaks them to test-takers
– A security vulnerability allows questions to be seen in advance
Receiving expert help while taking the test– One employee sits and coaches another during the test
– IM or phone help while taking a test
– A manager or proctor supervising the test helps a struggling employee
Using unauthorized test aids– Access to the Internet allows googling the answers
– Unauthorized study guides brought to the test
Using a proxy test taker– A manager sends an assistant or secretary to take the test in place of him/her
– Other situations where a colleague stands in for another
Tampering with answer sheets or stored test results– Technically minded employees subvert communication with the LMS or other corporate systems and change their results
Copying answers from another user– Two people sitting near each other share or copy answers
– Organized answer sharing within a cohort or group of trainees


If you are interested in learning more about any of the threats above, I’ve shared approaches to mitigate them in the workplace in our webinar, Workplace Exams 101: How to Prevent Cheating. You can download the webinar recording slides HERE.