Our top 5 SlideShare presentations in Q1

Headshot JuliePosted by Julie Delazyn

I read and answer comments all the time from LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ about the value of the presentations we post on our Questionmark SlideShare page as well as the ways in which they are being shared and used.

Presentations make up a huge part of the way thought leaders at Questionmark pass on all the great information that comes from our various white papers, research and case studies. As we enter the second quarter of the year, we’d like to highlight some of the most popular presentations we’ve featured on the blog.

5. Using the Angoff Method to Set Cut Scores (Alan Wheaton and Jim Parry, USCG)
4. Alignment, Impact and Measurement with the A-model (Bruce C. Aaron, Ametrico)
3. EATP- Using a blended delivery model to drive strategic success for SAP certification (Susan Martin and Ralf Kirchgaessner, SAP and John Kleeman, Questionmark)
2. Measuring Social Learning in SharePoint with Assessments (John Kleeman, Questionmark)
1. Assess to Comply: how else can you be sure that employees understand? (John Kleeman, Questionmark)

Feel free to comment, share and let us know in which ways these have helped you!

Top 5 Questionmark Presentations on SlideShare in 2012

Posted by Julie Delazyn

As we near the end of the year, we’d like to highlight some of the most popular presentations we’ve featured here on the blog in 2012.

We have been sharing many presentations with you on our Questionmark SlideShare page – a great way to pass along what, our partners and customers have been learning about effective assessment and measurement I read and answer comments all the time from LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and, most recently, Google+ about the value of these presentations as well as the ways in which they are being shared and used.

The five most popular presentations on our SlideShare page… Drumroll, please…

5. Assessment translation, localisation and adaptation (Sue Orchard, Comms Multilingual)

4. Alignment, Impact and Measurement with the A-model (Bruce C. Aaron, Ametrico)

3. Using a Blended Delivery Model to Drive Strategic Success for SAP Certification (Questionmark/SAP co-presentation)

2. Measuring Social Learning in SharePoint with Assessments (John Kleeman, Questionmark)

1. Assess to Comply: how else can you be sure that employees understand? (John Kleeman, Questionmark)

Feel free to comment, share and let us know in which ways these have helped you!

Stay tuned next week for our 5 most-viewed videos of 2012.

This year’s top five blog posts

Posted by Julie Delazyn

From videos to SlideShare presentations, we use this blog to share research findings, best practices and success stories related to assessment and measurement.

But what do you think of the subjects we cover?

We took a look to see the five most requested posts in this past year. Here they are, in no particular order:

12 Tips for Writing Good Test Questions

With so much to remember about writing effective test questions, this post makes it easy to focus on what’s important.

Use a survey with feedback to aid student retention

Questionmark Chairman John Kleeman shares a success story about how students at the University of Glamorgan in Wales answer questions about aspects of their studying and receive feedback to help them improve. He describes how and “Early Days” exercise for new students and a “Study Health Check Exercise” for all students help avoid situations that can lead to drop-out.

Being a Good SME Wrangler

Questionmark Product Manager Jim Farrell talks about how important it is for instructional designers to empower subject matter experts (SMEs) to transfer their knowledge and to involve them in creating deliverables to be used by their peers. He considers how Questionmark Live can help learning professionals foster successful relationships with SMEs by making it easy to harvest content from them.


Golden Topics: Making success on key topics essential for passing a test

This post takes a look at why some topics can be more important than others and how testing should reflect that fact. It also explains how to set up tests that require participants to achieve a particular score on critical topics as well as a passing score on the entire test.


Timing is Everything: Using psychology research to make your assessments more effective

John Kleeman offers a SlideShare presentation that will help you learn about psychology research and how you can apply it to improve your use of assessments.

Five faves: Top blog posts cover assessment hot topics and best practices

Posted by Julie Delazyn

Blogging makes it easy for us here at Questionmark to pass along news about assessment and tips about best practices.

As our readership continues to grow, so has the conversation on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and, most recently, Google+ . What stories have generated the most buzz during the last couple of years? We thought it would be helpful to highlight our five most popular blog posts and make them all available to you on the same page:

Topic based feedback goes to the ball

Questionmark Chairman John Kleeman explains the untapped learning value in topic feedback.

12 Tips for Writing Good Test Questions

Writing effective questions takes time and practice. Joan Phaup highlights 12 tips for writing and reviewing reliable and defensible test questions.

How many items are needed for each topic in an assessment? How PwC decide.

John Kleeman takes a look PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers)’s use of a five-stage model for diagnostic assessments and how it works.

Understanding Assessment Validity and Reliability

How can authors make sure they are producing valid, reliable assessments? I offer a few tips from the Questionmark White Paper, Assessments through the Learning Process.

What makes a good diagnostic question?

John Kleeman describes the common use of a diagnostic question as well as tactics for testing the quality of a question.

Feel free to comment and share. Let us know how these have helped you. And what are your favorite kinds of posts?

5 Things to Remember When Working with SMEs

jim_small Posted by Jim Farrell

Over the past two years, I have mentioned that  Questionmark Live is a great tool for working with Subject Matter Experts (SMEs). Today I wanted to share some things to keep in mind when working with SMEs on creating assessments.

1. All SMEs are NOT created equal

Very often we allow the business to decide how and who we work with when mining information from functional teams. This can be dangerous on many levels. The business might have people on the bench or “with some extra time”. Perhaps there is a reason why the person has “extra time”. This SME might not be a high contributor and the business doesn’t mind giving you their time. I believe it is worthwhile to interview your SMEs before agreeing to have them on a project. If a SME is not respected by leaders or their peers, then their work will not be accepted.

2. A very experienced SME is NOT always the best SME

SMEs with a lot experience often have their own ways of doing things. Yes, they have been on the battle lines and know what is required and what is “extra.” But their resulting shortcuts – although they may get the job done – can sometimes result in risky information collection. Although these SME-created shortcuts may get the job done, it is a risky way to collect information. These shortcuts are usually not officially backed by the business and may only work when you have the background knowledge the experienced SME owns. A less experienced SME may be more motivated to improve and educate.

3. Present everything to SMEs upfront

SMEs are very busy people. Even if they are individual contributors they are likely to be involved in a multitude of projects, often in leadership roles. It is very important to give your expectations up front. What are their duties? How much time will you require from them? What processes will you follow? What are your timelines? What are the expected outcomes? You have to be ready to answer all of these questions before calling on someone to be a SME.

4. Get to know SMEs on their own turf

In my experience, the best way to earn trust and establish credibility with SMEs is to work with them where they perform their jobs. I stated earlier that an interview will help you learn if a SME is worthy but you won’t understand their true potential without walking in their shoes (or at least very close to them). Spending a little bit of time in the business will let you better understand the nuances that make the SMEs job so important.

5. Make sure to celebrate success

Don’t forget to recognize when teams of SMEs reach milestones that you have set out for them. It is probably worth mentioning the importance of recognizing and documenting failures, too. Sometimes that learning experience is just as powerful.